By the Gods!

Let's get Mythical.

228 notes

sarahippen:

I have always loved the idea that mermaids were once women cast off ships. I figure fish demons take pity and seize the opportunity by forming a symbiotic relationship and live together forever. 
Mermaids are hardcore. 

sarahippen:

I have always loved the idea that mermaids were once women cast off ships. I figure fish demons take pity and seize the opportunity by forming a symbiotic relationship and live together forever. 

Mermaids are hardcore. 

3,063 notes

medievalpoc:

distant-relatives-blog:

 The University of Sankoré, or Sankore Masjid is one of three ancient centers of learning located in TimbuktuMaliWest Africa. The three mosques of Sankoré, Djinguereber Mosque and Sidi Yahya compose the famous University of Timbuktu. During the 14th -16th century, Sankore University enrolled more foreigen students than New York University today. 

The Mali Empire gained direct control over the city of Timbuktu in 1324 during the reign of Mansa Kankou Musa also known as Musa I “King of Kings”. He designed and saw the construction of one of Sankore’s first great mosques and the Jingeray Ber Masjid in 1327.The foundations of the previous structure were laid around 988 A.D. on the orders of the city’s chief judge Al-Qadi Aqib ibn Mahmud ibn Umar. A local mandinka lady, esteemed for her wealth, financed his plans to turn Sankoré into a world class learning institution. 

By the end of Mansa Musa’s reign (early 14th century CE), the Sankoré Masjid had been converted into a fully staffed Madrassa (Islamic school or in this case university) with the largest collections of books in Africa since the Library of Alexandria. The level of learning at Timbuktu’s Sankoré University was superior to that of all other Islamic centers in the world. The Sankoré Masjid was capable of housing 25,000 students and had one of the largest libraries in the world with between 400,000 to 700,000 manuscripts.

Today, the intellectual legacy of Timbuktu is neglected in historical discourse. These pages of WORLD history tend to get ripped out.   

Learn more about the surviving manuscripts of the library of Timbuktu and its fate here.

(via bad-motivator)

395 notes

oldschoolfrp:

Queen Hildeburh challenges a Valkyrie to combat.  (Lora Louise Freeland, from “Valkyrie Settlement” by Susan Shwartz, story inspired by a character referenced in Beowulf, Dragon magazine No. 85, May 1984.) 

oldschoolfrp:

Queen Hildeburh challenges a Valkyrie to combat.  (Lora Louise Freeland, from “Valkyrie Settlement” by Susan Shwartz, story inspired by a character referenced in Beowulf, Dragon magazine No. 85, May 1984.) 

(via skinnyghost)

176 notes

bythegods:

Romulus and Remus

The twin sons of Mars, the God of War, torn from their mortal mother at birth by a king nervous of their power and lineage, Romulus and Remus were thrown into the river Tiber. The river couldn’t get the job done, however, and their cradle washed up on a mud bank a few miles away. Mars sent his sacred animal, the wolf, to look after his sons, and they were nourished by the wolf’s milk and protected by her until being found by a shepherd.

Time passed, and long story short, they founded the city of Rome. At one point, the twins got into a bit of a tiff, and Romulus killed Remus with a spade. Romulus, though, went on to rule Rome with a strong hand, and the city flourished. 

The Romulus and Remus myth for Rome’s founding was about as popular as that of Aeneas. The she-wolf became the symbol of Roman nationhood around 500 BCE.

Filed under mythology roman rome progenitor myth ancient ancient rome

910 notes

british-history:

The Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his Wife are Assassinated
28 June 1914
Today is the 100th anniversary of the assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie. After leaving a reception in Sarajevo, the driver of their car took a wrong turn and was forced to back down a small street in order to turn around. Seeing the couple in a vulnerable spot, a Serb nationalist named Gavrilo Princip shot to them to death at point-blank range. Their deaths triggered the chain of events that led a month later to the start of World War I — a horrifying, bloody four-year conflict that killed some 14 million people, collapsed empires and redrew large parts of the world’s map. The photograph below shows the couple entering the car in which they would be killed, following a reception at Sarajevo City Hall.

british-history:

The Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his Wife are Assassinated

28 June 1914

Today is the 100th anniversary of the assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie. After leaving a reception in Sarajevo, the driver of their car took a wrong turn and was forced to back down a small street in order to turn around. Seeing the couple in a vulnerable spot, a Serb nationalist named Gavrilo Princip shot to them to death at point-blank range. Their deaths triggered the chain of events that led a month later to the start of World War I — a horrifying, bloody four-year conflict that killed some 14 million people, collapsed empires and redrew large parts of the world’s map. The photograph below shows the couple entering the car in which they would be killed, following a reception at Sarajevo City Hall.

477 notes

fightzine:

andreakalfas:

ARGUS, the many-eyed demi-god, is a psychic-type mystical fighter who specializes in paralyzing her opponents with her gaze and holding them in crippling mental pain. Nearly impossible to sneak up on, she maintains a vigilant defense against physical attacks with evasive hovering, as any contact with her eye-covered body can do serious damage. The large eye on her forehead, when opened, casts a heavily destructive wide beam of light, but it forces all of Argus’s other eyes closed and leaves her vulnerable for the duration. An orbiting shroud covers the eye until she needs its power. Fighters that want to take on Argus should employ blinding techniques: bright flashes of light, obstructive smoke, or sprays of ink. While impervious to attacks of willpower, physical attacks can bring Argus down easily if fighters manage to blind all of her eyes.
Okay, now come up from that deep dark pool of nerdiness…this is Argus, my submission to Jenn Woodall’s latest anthology zine, FIGHT! Round 1! It features many talented illustrators the likes of Kali Ciesemier, Sam Bosma, Jimmy Giegerich, Valentin Seiche + more, and it’s gonna be rad as hell.

Andrea’s piece for FIGHT! is just gorgeous!! I have such love for the colour purple and also EYEBALLS EVERYWHERE! This is just fantastic! Thank you, Andrea!

Marginally related at best, but the fight zine project is WAY COOL, guys.

fightzine:

andreakalfas:

ARGUS, the many-eyed demi-god, is a psychic-type mystical fighter who specializes in paralyzing her opponents with her gaze and holding them in crippling mental pain. Nearly impossible to sneak up on, she maintains a vigilant defense against physical attacks with evasive hovering, as any contact with her eye-covered body can do serious damage. The large eye on her forehead, when opened, casts a heavily destructive wide beam of light, but it forces all of Argus’s other eyes closed and leaves her vulnerable for the duration. An orbiting shroud covers the eye until she needs its power. Fighters that want to take on Argus should employ blinding techniques: bright flashes of light, obstructive smoke, or sprays of ink. While impervious to attacks of willpower, physical attacks can bring Argus down easily if fighters manage to blind all of her eyes.

Okay, now come up from that deep dark pool of nerdiness…this is Argus, my submission to Jenn Woodall’s latest anthology zine, FIGHT! Round 1! It features many talented illustrators the likes of Kali Ciesemier, Sam Bosma, Jimmy Giegerich, Valentin Seiche + more, and it’s gonna be rad as hell.

Andrea’s piece for FIGHT! is just gorgeous!! I have such love for the colour purple and also EYEBALLS EVERYWHERE! This is just fantastic! Thank you, Andrea!

Marginally related at best, but the fight zine project is WAY COOL, guys.

986 notes

coolchicksfromhistory:

The 14th Century Women of Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella, and Mercuriade
Art by Tiny Tarakeet (tumblr)
Schola Medica Salernitana was the most important medical school in medieval Europe.  Located in the southern Italian city of Salerno, the school served as a cultural crossroads, integrating Greek, Roman, Jewish, and Arabic teachings.  Professors at Schola Medica Salernitana produced translations, treatises, and reference books that influenced physicians and medical schools across Europe for centuries. 
Many women are known to have studied or taught at Schola Medica Salernitana between 1000 and 1500 CE.  The most famous is the 12th century physician Trota.  The archives of Naples include numerous medical licenses granted to women without any apparent restrictions, although some mention that women are particularly suited to gynecology and obstetrics.  The entire department of women’s diseases at Schola Medica Salernitana was run by female physicians.  
Pictured above are three 14th century female physicians associated with Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella and Mercuriade.  Rebecca de Guarna was a physician and surgeon native to Salerno who wrote treatises on fevers, urine, and embryology.  Abella (also known as Abella of Castellomata or Abella of Salerno) was a Roman physician who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She produced academic works on black bile and seminal fluid  Mercuriade was a physician and surgeon who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She also published treatises on fevers and wounds.
By the end of the 14th century the medical school at Salerno had fallen from favor as schools in Naples, Bologna, and Montpelier rose in prominence. Today, Schola Medica Salernitana is a museum.  

coolchicksfromhistory:

The 14th Century Women of Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella, and Mercuriade

Art by Tiny Tarakeet (tumblr)

Schola Medica Salernitana was the most important medical school in medieval Europe.  Located in the southern Italian city of Salerno, the school served as a cultural crossroads, integrating Greek, Roman, Jewish, and Arabic teachings.  Professors at Schola Medica Salernitana produced translations, treatises, and reference books that influenced physicians and medical schools across Europe for centuries. 

Many women are known to have studied or taught at Schola Medica Salernitana between 1000 and 1500 CE.  The most famous is the 12th century physician Trota.  The archives of Naples include numerous medical licenses granted to women without any apparent restrictions, although some mention that women are particularly suited to gynecology and obstetrics.  The entire department of women’s diseases at Schola Medica Salernitana was run by female physicians.  

Pictured above are three 14th century female physicians associated with Schola Medica Salernitana: Rebecca de Guarna, Abella and Mercuriade.  Rebecca de Guarna was a physician and surgeon native to Salerno who wrote treatises on fevers, urine, and embryology.  Abella (also known as Abella of Castellomata or Abella of Salerno) was a Roman physician who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She produced academic works on black bile and seminal fluid  Mercuriade was a physician and surgeon who taught at Schola Medica Salernitana.  She also published treatises on fevers and wounds.

By the end of the 14th century the medical school at Salerno had fallen from favor as schools in Naples, Bologna, and Montpelier rose in prominence. Today, Schola Medica Salernitana is a museum.  

96 notes

bythegods:

Judas Maccabeus
I figured we’d keep rolling with the Nine Worthies, so without further ado, I give you Judas Maccabeus, aka Judah Maccabee, warrior-general of the Maccabean revolt.
Judas was born and raised in the town of Modiin, just to the northwest of Jerusalem in the Levant. Back in the mid-2nd century BCE, the area was under the control of the Seleucid Empire (the successors to Babylon, Assyria, Persia, and much of Anatolia after Alexander of Macedon’s death). The Seleucids, unfortunately, weren’t big on the whole “religious freedom” thing, and the traditional Jewish forms of worship were completely forbidden. Even the Temple in Jerusalem had been filled with Hellenic idols.
Judas’ father, Mattathias, wasn’t particularly thrilled about these conditions. Neither were Judas, his brothers, and pretty much everyone else living in the once-kingdom-of-Israel. Mattathias started an armed revolt against the Seleucids, and when he died, Judas took up the lead role in the rebellion.
The meaning of the surname Maccabeus is debated; it could mean “anointed by God,” or it could be a condensed version of his battle cry, which translated to “Who among the Gods is like you, O Adonai?” My personal favourite translation, however, is “the Sledgehammer,” referring to his ferocity in battle, and his effectiveness in stomping Seleucids.
Heavily outnumbered, Judas waged a guerilla campaign against the Seleucids, inflicting devastating losses and even killing many of the Imperial Generals: he claimed the famous sword of Apollonius, a close friend of the Emperor, as his own, and used it in battle until his death.
Judas earned many victories, and at one point pushed the Seleucids out of the country around Jerusalem entirely. But they came back in redoubled force, and Judas’ people were plagued with internal division between traditional Jewish practices and the more Hellenized customs of Western Jews. Eventually, Judas stood alone against a massive Seleucid army with only a handful of men, and was killed. His death, however, rallied the Jewish people to a massive victory, and terms were reached that permitted religious freedom.
The feast of Hanukkah, still celebrated today, commemorates Judas Maccabeus’ restoration of the Temple of Jerusalem in 164 BCE.

bythegods:

Judas Maccabeus

I figured we’d keep rolling with the Nine Worthies, so without further ado, I give you Judas Maccabeus, aka Judah Maccabee, warrior-general of the Maccabean revolt.

Judas was born and raised in the town of Modiin, just to the northwest of Jerusalem in the Levant. Back in the mid-2nd century BCE, the area was under the control of the Seleucid Empire (the successors to Babylon, Assyria, Persia, and much of Anatolia after Alexander of Macedon’s death). The Seleucids, unfortunately, weren’t big on the whole “religious freedom” thing, and the traditional Jewish forms of worship were completely forbidden. Even the Temple in Jerusalem had been filled with Hellenic idols.

Judas’ father, Mattathias, wasn’t particularly thrilled about these conditions. Neither were Judas, his brothers, and pretty much everyone else living in the once-kingdom-of-Israel. Mattathias started an armed revolt against the Seleucids, and when he died, Judas took up the lead role in the rebellion.

The meaning of the surname Maccabeus is debated; it could mean “anointed by God,” or it could be a condensed version of his battle cry, which translated to “Who among the Gods is like you, O Adonai?” My personal favourite translation, however, is “the Sledgehammer,” referring to his ferocity in battle, and his effectiveness in stomping Seleucids.

Heavily outnumbered, Judas waged a guerilla campaign against the Seleucids, inflicting devastating losses and even killing many of the Imperial Generals: he claimed the famous sword of Apollonius, a close friend of the Emperor, as his own, and used it in battle until his death.

Judas earned many victories, and at one point pushed the Seleucids out of the country around Jerusalem entirely. But they came back in redoubled force, and Judas’ people were plagued with internal division between traditional Jewish practices and the more Hellenized customs of Western Jews. Eventually, Judas stood alone against a massive Seleucid army with only a handful of men, and was killed. His death, however, rallied the Jewish people to a massive victory, and terms were reached that permitted religious freedom.

The feast of Hanukkah, still celebrated today, commemorates Judas Maccabeus’ restoration of the Temple of Jerusalem in 164 BCE.