By the Gods!

Let's get Mythical.

601 notes

volchitza:

literature meme | [1/1] epic: The Iliad

The Iliad (sometimes referred to as the Song of Ilion or Song of Ilium) is an ancient Greek epic poem in dactylic hexameter, traditionally attributed to Homer. Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles.

Along with the Odyssey, the Iliad is among the oldest extant works of Western literature, and its written version is usually dated to around the eighth century BC.

(via theancientworld)

357 notes

bythegods:

Hel

Ruler of the Germanic Netherworld, Hel was not a goddess to be trifled with; she was one mean ol’ lady. To be fair, I’d be angry too if Odin banished me to the smelly old netherworld (dubbed Helheim for its ruler). She was the daughter of the trickster god, Loki, and the frost giantess Angrboda. Those frost giants are always trouble, and don’t even get me started on Loki. 

Hel had the face and body of a living woman, but her thighs and legs were those of a decomposing corpse. Her brothers were Fenrir and Jormungandr, so it’s easy to see that horrifying evil ran in the family. Hel’s gloomy realm stood in stark contrast to Odin’s Valhalla in terms of afterlife, and indeed the Christians would later take Hel’s name for their realm of eternal damnation. 

Hel’s throne was known as the “Sick Bed,” as those who died from sickness and old age were the subjects of Hel. In Helheim itself, Hel held more power even than Odin, who had banished her there, and the Aesir appeal to her for aid in several stories from the Eddas. When you compare the endless feasting and merriment of Valhalla with the sickly eternity of Helheim, it’s no wonder being a warrior and dying in battle was so sought after by the Germanic tribes. 

Filed under germanic norse scandinavian myth mythology religion goddess monster pagan paganism

306 notes

tammuz:

Relief depicting the eagle-headed Assyrian god Nisroch (the word for eagle in Arabic is Nisr) on the walls of the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud (883-859 BCE). The god Nisroch is associated with the Assyrian king Sennacherib, who conquered and destroyed Babylon and Judah in 700-701 BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

tammuz:

Relief depicting the eagle-headed Assyrian god Nisroch (the word for eagle in Arabic is Nisr) on the walls of the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud (883-859 BCE). The god Nisroch is associated with the Assyrian king Sennacherib, who conquered and destroyed Babylon and Judah in 700-701 BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

261,492 notes

cellarspider:

twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck:

purrsianstuck:

During the Bubonic Plague, doctors wore these bird-like masks to avoid becoming sick. They would fill the beaks with spices and rose petals, so they wouldn’t have to smell the rotting bodies. 

A theory during the Bubonic Plague was that the plague was caused by evil spirits. To scare the spirits away, the masks were intentionally designed to be creepy. 

Mission fucking accomplished

Okay so I love this but it doesn’t cover the half of why the design is awesome and actually borders on making sense.

It wasn’t just that they didn’t want to smell the infected and dead, they thought it was crucial to protecting themselves. They had no way of knowing about what actually caused the plague, and so one of the other theories was that the smell of the infected all by itself was evil and could transmit the plague. So not only would they fill their masks with aromatic herbs and flowers, they would also burn fires in public areas, so that the smell of the smoke would “clear the air”. This all related to the miasma theory of contagion, which was one of the major theories out there until the 19th century. And it makes sense, in a way. Plague victims smelled awful, and there’s a general correlation between horrible septic smells and getting horribly sick if you’re around what causes them for too long.

You can see now that we’ve got two different theories as to what caused the plague that were worked into the design. That’s because the whole thing was an attempt by the doctors to cover as many bases as they could think of, and we’re still not done.

The glass eyepieces. They were either darkened or red, not something you generally want to have to contend with when examining patients. But the plague might be spread by eye contact via the evil eye, so best to ward that off too.

The illustration shows a doctor holding a stick. This was an examination tool, that helped the doctors keep some distance between themselves and the infected. They already had gloves on, but the extra level of separation was apparently deemed necessary. You could even take a pulse with it. Or keep people the fuck away from you, which was apparently a documented use.

Finally, the robe. It’s not just to look fancy, the cloth was waxed, as were all of the rest of their clothes. What’s one of the properties of wax? Water-based fluids aren’t absorbed by it. This was the closest you could get to a sterile, fully protecting garment back then. Because at least one person along the line was smart enough to think “Gee, I’d really rather not have the stuff coming out of those weeping sores anywhere on my person”.

So between all of these there’s a real sense that a lot of real thought was put into making sure the doctors were protected, even if they couldn’t exactly be sure from what. They worked with what information they had. And frankly, it’s a great design given what was available! You limit exposure to aspirated liquids, limit exposure to contaminated liquids already present, you limit contact with the infected. You also don’t give fleas any really good place to hop onto. That’s actually useful.

Beyond that, there were contracts the doctors would sign before they even got near a patient. They were to be under quarantine themselves, they wouldn’t treat patients without a custodian monitoring them and helping when something had to be physically contacted, and they would not treat non-plague patients for the duration. There was an actual system in place by the time the plague doctors really became a thing to make sure they didn’t infect anyone either.

These guys were the product of the scientific process at work, and the scientific process made a bitchin’ proto-hazmat suit. And containment protocols!

(via sundherstruck)

189 notes

What Happened to Canada?

bad-motivator:

sam:

lifeaquatic:

This is a good piece that sums up what I try to tell American friends on a regular basis. Especially when it comes to this:

If there is a battle over the future of Canada, its frontline is the issue of resource extraction. This is where the most frightening stories are emerging and the most dynamic forms of resistance as well. 

Welcome to my world. It’s pretty insane to watch it all unfold.

A thing you should all read.

Ooof.

Just in case some of you were interested in the downward spiral of my suddenly-terrible country.

(via blinddog)

144 notes

british-history:

The Coronation of Henry V
9 April 1413
King Henry V of England was crowned in a ceremony at Westminster, on this day in British history, 9 April 1413. The coronation was officiated by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Arundel. The only main details recorded by contemporary chroniclers focus on the bad weather–a snowstorm–and on the food served at the banquet. Because the coronation had taken place on Passion Sunday, and the English monarchs were still Catholic, the only meat served at the banquet was fish.

british-history:

The Coronation of Henry V

9 April 1413

King Henry V of England was crowned in a ceremony at Westminster, on this day in British history, 9 April 1413. The coronation was officiated by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Arundel. The only main details recorded by contemporary chroniclers focus on the bad weather–a snowstorm–and on the food served at the banquet. Because the coronation had taken place on Passion Sunday, and the English monarchs were still Catholic, the only meat served at the banquet was fish.

193 notes

bythegods:

Balor

The Irish Cyclops Balor was a one-eyed god of death, and the most formidable of the Fomorii––you remember them, right? The violent and monstrous sea gods who ruled Ireland before the arrival of the Tuatha De Danann, the “nicer” gods and goddesses. 

So dreadful was the one eye of Balor that he destroyed whoever he looked upon, and his eyelid had to be levered up by four servants. It was prophesied that he would be slain by his own grandson, as is often the case with gods and their inconvenient yet inexorable prophecies. He stowed his daughter Ethlinn in a crystal tower on Tory Island, but a determined young god named Cian made it up to provide her with some bonafide lovin’

Balor found out that his daughter had popped out three sons, and ordered them drowned. The servants wrapped the boys up in a sheet, but on the way to the whirlpool, one of the boys fell out, unnoticed. That boy was Lugh, the sun-god-to-be. He was taken to Manannan Mac Lir, the god of the sea, and fostered. Once he was grown, Mac Lir took him to a major battle against the Fomorii. Balor wreaked havoc on the Tuatha De Danann with his lethal gaze, but eventually Lugh crept near him with a magic slingshot, taking advantage of Balor’s weariness in a moment when his eye was closed. As soon as that ugly eyeball opened up again, Lugh fired a shot into it, and it hit so hard that Balor’s eye was blown backward through his head, and all the Fomorii behind him suffered the power of its stare. The Fomorii, in losing this battle, were driven from Ireland forever.

An oldie from the archives.

23 notes

yamaharfang asked: Totally added that book to my wish list. I'm currently on The Worm Ouroboros. Have you read it? I'd recommend it. (Apologies if you've already mentioned it!)

No I have not read it but HOW HAVE I NOT HEARD OF THIS.

It sounds totally amazing and that biz is goin’ on my “to-read” like RIGHT MEOW!

THANK YOU! <3