By the Gods!

Let's get Mythical.

863 notes

art-of-swords:

Victorian Cinquedea Dagger 

  • Provenance: The William Ashby Collection

The Cinquedea (“five fingers”, in reference to the blade width) was a popular civilian sidearm originating in Northern Italy circa 1525-1550. This is a Victorian example measuring 22 3/4 inches overall, the blade is 17 inches long and 3 1/2 inches wide across the base, with ten fullers on each side, arranged in four expanding rows from tip to base, the last two rows on each side are decorated with golden scroll and leafy vine patterns, extending 9 inches upward, surrounding a 2 inch wide scene of a Greco-Roman deity on each side.

One side features Jupiter/Zeus sitting in his chair, lightning clenched in his fist, while Aquila, the eagle responsible for carrying and guarding the bolts, looks on. The reverse shows Pluto/Hades seated on a throne with a scroll in his hand, while Cerberus, the 3-headed guard dog of the underworld, is seated beside him and a cypress tree in the background. The gold decoration continues on the guard and pommel, with a pair of smooth ivory grip panels fitted with cut-through metal disc accents. 

Source: Copyright © 2014 Rock Island Auctions

40 notes

sarahippen:

HELLO ALL!

I’m gonna get back on the horse, moving to vancouver really took a heckovalot out of me! 

Expect more pikmin to come. 

Follow Sarah’s art blog for Pikmins and perhaps other things

sarahippen:

HELLO ALL!

I’m gonna get back on the horse, moving to vancouver really took a heckovalot out of me! 

Expect more pikmin to come. 

Follow Sarah’s art blog for Pikmins and perhaps other things

280 notes

dsbeans:

Tigris and Euphrates is a pretty deep and simple game. Placing tiles, scoring points and resolving conflicts in ancient Mesopotamia has never been easier. 

Players place tiles, building the great civilizations of the ancient world, one piece at a time. While you can place anywhere you wish, it is the location of the leaders, those wooden discs, which determine who scores the points (or if anyone scores points) for placing the tile.

Conflict occurs when two leaders of the same colour are placed within a single kingdom or when two kingdoms are connected through the placement of a tile. These conflicts are quick and unforgiving, giving the potential to quickly change both a player’s position on the board and the makeup of the board itself.

The tiles and map itself are quaint and subtle in their design, owing largely to the fact that this a game that is going to be approaching its 20th anniversary in a few years. The wooden playing pieces - the monuments and the leaders are great and their tactile weight and texture give a lot of weight to the game itself; moving or placing a leader feels as heavy as the decision itself.

It’s a fun game to teach and a great game to play, with play usually starting off fairly simple and gradually building in complexity into a crescendo of tough turns. Knizia’s scoring methods also play an important role in turning this game into one filled with tension. 

(via allmesopotamia)

418 notes

Maaaaan,

It’s so hard for me to not just turn this into a Guardians of the Galaxy fan blog.

Did you guys SEE THAT SH*T?

I can keep it on theme I mean there’s a character named Gamora and uhhh they use the song “Spirit in the Sky.” So there you go. Mythology blog.

Filed under guardians of the galaxy mythology reasons

6,720 notes

medievalpoc:

afro-dominicano:

Why are conservatives afraid of Neil deGrasse Tyson?

I really liked some of the points made in this article save for the Bill Maher’s comment, didn’t really need it. But the general point made about a scientifically literate public bringing a political fallout was spot on.

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson has been the recipient of a seemingly bizarre political backlash — after the conservative magazine National Review penned a takedown cover story on the “Cosmos” host last week depicting him as a smug, intellectual bully.

The story struck many as odd given Tyson’s gentle, geeky presentation style. Comedian Bill Maher had Tyson on his HBO show over the weekend, trying to make sense of the backlash.

“You’re a scientist, and a black one, who’s smarter than [conservatives] are,” Maher quipped.

The line got laughs, but it’s worth remembering that Tyson served the George W. Bush administration as a member of the Commission on Moon, Mars and Beyond in 2004. Conservatives have no problem harnessing Tyson’s intellect.

No, the danger Tyson brings to the political structure, as he gains an increasingly large foothold in the popular culture, is the threat of an informed populace.

“When you’re scientifically literate, the world looks different to you,” Tyson wrote in 2011. “It’s a particular way of questioning what you see and hear. When empowered by this state of mind, objective realities matter. These are the truths of the world that exist outside of whatever your belief system tells you.”

That may not sound radical, but the promise of a large, nerdy, young voting block that subscribes to Tyson’s sentiment is a threat to the political status quo — certainly Republicans, but Democrats as well.

Imagine if millions of young Tyson fans stopped searching for facts to confirm their personal biases, or ceased prioritizing using their education to leverage personal wealth, and instead sought the most sound solutions to identifiable problems for the betterment of the species. If the rising generation of young voters actually starts demanding rational, evidence-guided leadership, few in our current crop of elected officials would survive the political fallout.

Consider this: In 1995, the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment — a nonpartisan panel of scientists and researchers assembled to offer objective technical guidance to Congress on scientifically complex issues — was stripped of all funding, effectively shutting it down. (Officially, it still exists on paper.) It has remained unfunded ever since. (Thanks, Newt Gingrich.) An attempt in May to provide a paltry $2.5 million to the office was stymied by House Republicans.

In a world where advanced technology has infiltrated nearly every corner of our lives — raising a litany of technical, ethical and legal challenges — our government is willfully scientifically illiterate.

The reason this status quo has been allowed to persist is that the general population isn’t much better. Conservatives continue to fight any attempts to combat climate change, while many liberals are refusing to vaccinate their children over fears of a nonexistent link to autism. It wouldn’t be hard to predict a liberal backlash against Tyson, similar to the one we’re seeing from conservatives, if he were to speak more prominently about his endorsement of genetically modified foods — one of the more scientifically unfounded banner arguments of the left.

Tyson is a threat to this cone of ignorance and self-interest. He’s a champion of knowledge and the human potential. He brings the fundamental belief that our species is destined for something greater than the interminable squabble between self-interested individuals and rival nations and dwindling resources — that our collective efforts can be applied to the pursuit of knowledge, ultimately paving the way for our exploration of the galaxy.

That’s a vision people can get behind. It’s also one that could potentially upend everything we know.

Math and Science Week!

(via sundherstruck)

1,322 notes

art-of-swords:

The Sword of Temporal Justice
Maker: Zandona Ferrara (bladesmith, active circa 1600)
Additional creators: Rundell Bridge & Rundell (jeweller)
Dated: 1821 (scabbard)
Medium: iron, steel, copper, wood with scabbard of leather, velvet, silver gilt
Measurements: 116.5 x 99.3 cm
Acquirer: Charles I, King of Great Britain (1600-49), when King of Great Britain (1625-49)
Provenance: probably supplied for the coronation of Charles I in 1626
The sword has a gilt-iron hilt with a wooden, wire-bound grip, the steel blade tapering to a leaf-shaped point; symbols like open lozenges are stamped in the gutters with the maker’s name. Velvet-covered leather scabbard with gold embroidery and silver-gilt mounts.
This sword, known as the Sword of Temporal Justice, is one of three swords which are carried unsheathed, pointing upwards, in the coronation procession.
This sword is accompanied by the Sword of Spiritual Justice and the Sword of Mercy (with a blunted tip). The practice of carrying three swords, representing kingly virtues, dates back to the coronation of Richard the Lionheart in 1189.
The three swords were made for the coronation of Charles I in 1626 and then placed with the regalia in Westminster Abbey. Together with the coronation spoon, these three works were the only pieces to survive the Civil War and Interregnum untouched.
It is not known whether they were used in the coronation procession of Charles II, but they have certainly been used since 1685. A new scabbard was made for the sword in 1821 for the coronation of George IV.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

The Sword of Temporal Justice

  • Maker: Zandona Ferrara (bladesmith, active circa 1600)
  • Additional creators: Rundell Bridge & Rundell (jeweller)
  • Dated: 1821 (scabbard)
  • Medium: iron, steel, copper, wood with scabbard of leather, velvet, silver gilt
  • Measurements: 116.5 x 99.3 cm
  • Acquirer: Charles I, King of Great Britain (1600-49), when King of Great Britain (1625-49)
  • Provenance: probably supplied for the coronation of Charles I in 1626

The sword has a gilt-iron hilt with a wooden, wire-bound grip, the steel blade tapering to a leaf-shaped point; symbols like open lozenges are stamped in the gutters with the maker’s name. Velvet-covered leather scabbard with gold embroidery and silver-gilt mounts.

This sword, known as the Sword of Temporal Justice, is one of three swords which are carried unsheathed, pointing upwards, in the coronation procession.

This sword is accompanied by the Sword of Spiritual Justice and the Sword of Mercy (with a blunted tip). The practice of carrying three swords, representing kingly virtues, dates back to the coronation of Richard the Lionheart in 1189.

The three swords were made for the coronation of Charles I in 1626 and then placed with the regalia in Westminster Abbey. Together with the coronation spoon, these three works were the only pieces to survive the Civil War and Interregnum untouched.

It is not known whether they were used in the coronation procession of Charles II, but they have certainly been used since 1685. A new scabbard was made for the sword in 1821 for the coronation of George IV.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

149 notes

sarahippen:

101 followers?! ANOTHER DRAW!

Man this is exciting! Reblog or like this post and enter yourself in the draw to win a mermaid print mailed to you!

I’ll end this contest by August 4th!

Thanks for all the follows!

(via bythegods)