By the Gods!

Let's get Mythical.

23 notes

sarahippen:

MAGNET COMMISSIONS!

8$ for a portrait magnet! Deals can be negotiated for larger purchases!

Hey everyone, sorry I haven’t posted in a long while, but here’s a commission opportunity if anyone’s interested! I made these magnets for friends and family last christmas, and I think they could make great additions to any fridge any time of year! These magnets are about 3 inches diameter. 

Message me if you’re interested!

We interrupt our regularly scheduled program to plug my sister’s art blog! Hit her up!

(via sarahippen)

121 notes

bobek792 asked: whats the accepted timeline for biblical events such as exodus? who was the pharoah? were the Jews the Habiru or the Hyksos?

historicity-was-already-taken:

Some archaeologists, and myself, hold to the theory that Exodus is actually a folk memory of the Bronze Age era Egyptian imperial hegemony over the southern Levant. The people archaeologists can identify as being distinctively different from other Canaanite groups began to emerge in the central Judean hill country around 1200 BCE, and their settlements and inscriptions can be traced as distinctively “Israelite.” This is called the Israelites as Canaanites Theory. Exodus came into the form it is because the Biblical authors needed it for the cosmology they were constructing, and they borrowed extensively from Near Eastern literary tropes (the Baby With a Destiny Found in a Basket in a River, for instance) and Israelite folk memory in constructing it.

If you put the Books of Exodus/Joshua and Judges side by side and really read the texts, you’ll see that they tell the same story. One tells the story of an exiled people making their way home after so many years and violently reclaiming the land via military campaigns which left dubious archaeological imprints, and one tells the story of a loosely organized Iron Age tribal society sharing the same general folk religion and language gradually emerging and gaining power over other Canaanite groups, including the ones which were theoretically wiped out in Joshua.

….Biblical Studies was my jam in undergrad.

Further Reading: http://historicity-was-already-taken.tumblr.com/Further%20Reading#Biblical%20Scholarship

91 notes

british-history:

The Battle of Bouvines
27 July 1214
The Battle of Bouvines, an important though often overlooked medieval battle, took place on this day in British history, 27 July 1214. The battle ended ended the Anglo-French War (1202–1214), and fundamentally contributed to the early development of medieval France by confirming the French crown’s sovereignty over the Angevin lands of Brittany and Normandy.
Philip Augustus of France defeated an army consisting of Imperial German, English and Flemish soldiers, led by Otto IV of Germany. Other leaders included Count Ferrand of Flanders, William de Longespee and Renaud of Boulogne. The defeat was so decisive that Otto was deposed and replaced by Frederick II Hohenstaufen; Ferrand and Renaud were captured and imprisoned and King John of England was forced to sign the Magna Carta by his discontented barons. Philip was himself able to take undisputed control of most of the territories in France that had belonged to King John of England, Otto’s maternal uncle and ally.

british-history:

The Battle of Bouvines

27 July 1214

The Battle of Bouvines, an important though often overlooked medieval battle, took place on this day in British history, 27 July 1214. The battle ended ended the Anglo-French War (1202–1214), and fundamentally contributed to the early development of medieval France by confirming the French crown’s sovereignty over the Angevin lands of Brittany and Normandy.

Philip Augustus of France defeated an army consisting of Imperial German, English and Flemish soldiers, led by Otto IV of Germany. Other leaders included Count Ferrand of Flanders, William de Longespee and Renaud of Boulogne. The defeat was so decisive that Otto was deposed and replaced by Frederick II Hohenstaufen; Ferrand and Renaud were captured and imprisoned and King John of England was forced to sign the Magna Carta by his discontented barons. Philip was himself able to take undisputed control of most of the territories in France that had belonged to King John of England, Otto’s maternal uncle and ally.

807 notes

richard-miles-archaeologist:

Ancient Worlds - BBC Two
Episode 1 “Come Together”

Uruk - “the mother of all cities”.

Uruk was one of the most important cities in ancient Mesopotamia; an ancient city of Sumer -and later Babylonia, situated east of the present bed of the Euphrates river.  According to the Sumerian King List, it was founded by King Enmerkar sometime around 4500 BCE.

Uruk is considered the first true city in the world. It was home to 40.000 or perhaps 50.000 people, a population density unprecedented in human history.

In myth and literature, Uruk was famous as the capital city of Gilgamesh. The great epic poem The Legend of Gilgamesh contains a proud description of his city:

Go up, pace out the walls of Uruk.
Study the foundation terrace and examine the brickwork.
Is not its masonry of kiln - fired brick?
And did not seven masters lay its foundations?
One square mile of city, one square mile of gardens,
One square mile of clay pits, a half square mile of Ishtar’s dwelling,
Three and a half square miles is the measure of Uruk

PART I

Uruk, Iraq

(via allmesopotamia)

447 notes

sarahippen:

I have always loved the idea that mermaids were once women cast off ships. I figure fish demons take pity and seize the opportunity by forming a symbiotic relationship and live together forever. 
Mermaids are hardcore. 

sarahippen:

I have always loved the idea that mermaids were once women cast off ships. I figure fish demons take pity and seize the opportunity by forming a symbiotic relationship and live together forever. 

Mermaids are hardcore. 

3,270 notes

medievalpoc:

distant-relatives-blog:

 The University of Sankoré, or Sankore Masjid is one of three ancient centers of learning located in TimbuktuMaliWest Africa. The three mosques of Sankoré, Djinguereber Mosque and Sidi Yahya compose the famous University of Timbuktu. During the 14th -16th century, Sankore University enrolled more foreigen students than New York University today. 

The Mali Empire gained direct control over the city of Timbuktu in 1324 during the reign of Mansa Kankou Musa also known as Musa I “King of Kings”. He designed and saw the construction of one of Sankore’s first great mosques and the Jingeray Ber Masjid in 1327.The foundations of the previous structure were laid around 988 A.D. on the orders of the city’s chief judge Al-Qadi Aqib ibn Mahmud ibn Umar. A local mandinka lady, esteemed for her wealth, financed his plans to turn Sankoré into a world class learning institution. 

By the end of Mansa Musa’s reign (early 14th century CE), the Sankoré Masjid had been converted into a fully staffed Madrassa (Islamic school or in this case university) with the largest collections of books in Africa since the Library of Alexandria. The level of learning at Timbuktu’s Sankoré University was superior to that of all other Islamic centers in the world. The Sankoré Masjid was capable of housing 25,000 students and had one of the largest libraries in the world with between 400,000 to 700,000 manuscripts.

Today, the intellectual legacy of Timbuktu is neglected in historical discourse. These pages of WORLD history tend to get ripped out.   

Learn more about the surviving manuscripts of the library of Timbuktu and its fate here.

(via bad-motivator)

478 notes

oldschoolfrp:

Queen Hildeburh challenges a Valkyrie to combat.  (Lora Louise Freeland, from “Valkyrie Settlement” by Susan Shwartz, story inspired by a character referenced in Beowulf, Dragon magazine No. 85, May 1984.) 

oldschoolfrp:

Queen Hildeburh challenges a Valkyrie to combat.  (Lora Louise Freeland, from “Valkyrie Settlement” by Susan Shwartz, story inspired by a character referenced in Beowulf, Dragon magazine No. 85, May 1984.) 

(via skinnyghost)

186 notes

bythegods:

Romulus and Remus

The twin sons of Mars, the God of War, torn from their mortal mother at birth by a king nervous of their power and lineage, Romulus and Remus were thrown into the river Tiber. The river couldn’t get the job done, however, and their cradle washed up on a mud bank a few miles away. Mars sent his sacred animal, the wolf, to look after his sons, and they were nourished by the wolf’s milk and protected by her until being found by a shepherd.

Time passed, and long story short, they founded the city of Rome. At one point, the twins got into a bit of a tiff, and Romulus killed Remus with a spade. Romulus, though, went on to rule Rome with a strong hand, and the city flourished. 

The Romulus and Remus myth for Rome’s founding was about as popular as that of Aeneas. The she-wolf became the symbol of Roman nationhood around 500 BCE.

Filed under mythology roman rome progenitor myth ancient ancient rome